Radiologists use x-ray films to detect and help  diagnose certain conditions such as broken bones, pneumonia, and emphysema.General Radiology Links:

X-Rays
Intravenous Pyelogram

X-RAYS
Frequently Asked Questions

What are x-rays?
Do I need to prepare for my x-ray?
What can I expect during my x-ray examination?
Are x-rays safe?
What are the limitations of x-rays?
Where can I have my x-ray?

What are x-rays?
X-rays (also called radiographs) are produced by passing a small amount of controlled radiation through the body. Radiation from x-rays are absorbed differently by the tissues of the body. When the x-rays pass through the body, these differences are captured on a special film plate that is placed behind the patient. For example, bone absorbs more radiation than soft tissue, making it appear bright white on film. Radiologists use x-ray films to detect and help diagnose certain conditions such as broken bones, pneumonia, and emphysema.
foot x-rayhand x-ray
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Do I need to prepare for my x-ray?
No preparation is required unless you are having a special x-ray examination such as an intravenous pyelogram (IVP) or a myelogram.
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What can I expect during my x-ray examination?
Before your x-ray, you may be asked to change into an examination gown and to remove any metal from your body (eyeglasses, jewelry, watch). Next, you will be taken into the x-ray suite and positioned on an examination table or between a metal box and an apparatus that contains the x-ray tubes.

Once you are in position, the technologist will leave the room and may ask you to hold your breath if x-rays are taken of the chest. Holding your breath is very important because motion of the lungs during regular breathing can blur the images. Next, the technologist will come back into the room and you will most likely be asked to change position to allow imaging from different viewpoints.

After the x-rays have been taken, they will be processed and briefly reviewed by the radiologist to make sure that more images are not needed. You will then be asked to change back into your clothes.

After the radiologist has studied your x-ray films in more detail, a report will be sent to your referring physician, who will discuss these results with you and determine a course of action.
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Are x-rays safe?
Because x-ray studies involve radiation, special care will be taken to shield your body from scatter radiation with a lead apron. Today’s x-ray machines and film only need minimal amounts of radiation to produce a clear, detailed image. Because the radiation is highly controlled and targeted, damage to the cells of the body is very unlikely. The dose of radiation from a standard x-ray is the same amount of radiation that the average person receives from 10 days of naturally occurring background radiation.
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What are the limitations of x-rays?
Standard x-rays do not always detect disease, especially those of the lungs. Sometimes tumors have to grow very large before they are seen on x-ray. Instead of using regular x-rays to image the chest, some physicians request computed tomography (CT) scans. CT scans show detailed views of “slices” of the body, not just images from the front, back, and sides, as with standard x-rays. Click here to learn more about CT.
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Where can I have my x-ray?
X-ray studies are performed at the following Diagnostic Imaging Associates locations: Brandywine, Pike Creek, Omega, and Glasgow.
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INTRAVENOUS PYELOGRAM
Frequently Asked Questions

What is an intravenous pyelogram?
Is there any preparation for an IVP?
What can I expect during my IVP study?
Is this procedure safe?
ivpWhere can I have my IVP study?

What is an intravenous pyelogram?
An intravenous pyelogram (IVP) is an examination of the kidneys, ureter, and bladder using x-rays and a contrast medium to enhance the images. An IVP is used to detect tumors, kidney or bladder stones, blockages in normal urine flow, enlargement of the prostate, and injuries to the urinary tract.
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Is there any preparation for an IVP?
Before your scheduled appointment, you will be asked to pick up a 48-hour prep kit from the office where you will be having your IVP study. This kit will give you detailed instructions on how to prepare for your study, which includes taking a laxative and following a clear diet. You will also be asked not to eat or drink after midnight , the night before your procedure.
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What can I expect during my IVP study?
Before your IVP study, you will be asked to change into an examination gown and to remove any jewelry or other metal objects that might interfere with the x-ray images. After changing, you will be brought into one of our x-ray suites. One of our radiologic technologists will position you on the examination table. Suspended above the table will be a large metal apparatus that houses the x-ray tube.

At this time, a preliminary x-ray will be taken. Next, the radiologist will inject the contrast material into a vein in your arm. The contrast material makes sure that the urinary tract shows up clearly on the x-ray images. It is normal to feel flushed, have a metallic taste in your mouth, or feel mild itching after the contrast has been injected. In rare cases, some patients become short of breath or feel swelling in the throat. In these cases, the technologist should be alerted immediately because these may be signs of an allergic reaction.

After the contrast material has been injected, several images will be taken to track the contrast as it moves through the kidneys and urinary tract. You may be asked to switch to different positions throughout the study so that the radiologist can see what is happening from a variety of angles. A final x-ray may be taken after you have voided your bladder to see how much of the contrast is left in the urinary tract. By studying how the contrast moves through the urinary system, the radiologist is able to detect abnormalities and the efficiency with which the body handles waste. It will take approximately an hour to perform your IVP study.

Following your IVP study, the radiologist will analyze the images in detail. The findings from the study will be sent to your referring physician who will review the results with you.
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Is this procedure safe?
Because x-rays are used to obtain the IVPs, radiation exposure is a risk. However, with today’s machines, the procedures are fast and the x-rays are targeted to the area of interest in a small beam, preventing scatter radiation to other parts of the body. The amount of radiation received from an IVP study is the same amount of radiation that the average person receives in approximately 6 months from naturally occurring background radiation.
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Where can I have my IVP study?
IVP studies are performed at the following Diagnostic Imaging Associates locations: Brandywine, Pike Creek, Omega, and Glasgow. Please call our Central Scheduling Center at (302) 369-4342.
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Centralized Scheduling: (302) 369-4DIA (4342)
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